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Marine airflow exposure means that

Oregonian vineyards get hit by rains.

Most of the rain falls between

October and April, putting growers

up against a short growing season

and substantial vintage variation.

Strategically selecting grape varieties

to plant is critical. Fortunately, Pinot

Noir has a shorter growing season

than most red wine grapes.

WHO

DOESN’T

LOVE A

CHALLENGE?

Pinot Noir grapes.

ABOVE: Vineyards in the

Willamette Valley.

Only a handful of places in the world

can grow classically elegant Pinot

Noir, and Oregon is one of those

places. Interestingly, the same

tempering ocean influence that

precludes so many red wine grapes

from ripening in many of Oregon’s

vineyards is precisely what allows

Pinot to thrive there. The region’s

propensity for Pinot has even attracted

Burgundian producers such as

Drouhin and Jadot. Oregon gets

much more summer sunshine than

Burgundy and, in July, enjoys even

more sunshine hours than California.

THERE

ARE

FRINGE

BENEFITS